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Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 265-272

Revisiting cruciate paralysis: A case report and systematic review


Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Correspondence Address:
Nader S Dahdaleh
Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University, 676 N. St. Clair, Suite 2210, Chicago, IL, 60611
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-8237.193262

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Objective: Cruciate paralysis is a rare, poorly understood condition of the upper craniovertebral junction that allows for selective paralysis of the upper extremities while sparing the lower extremities. Reported cases are few and best treatment practices remain up for debate. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systemic literature review in an attempt to identify prognostic predictors and outcome trends associated with cases previously reported in the literature. Materials and Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review for all cases using the term "Cruciate Paralysis," reviewing a total of 37 reported cases. All outcomes were assigned a numerical value based on examination at the last follow up. These numerical values were further analyzed and tested for statistical significance. Results: Of the 37 cases, 78.4% were of traumatic causes. Of these, there were considerably worse outcomes associated with patients over the age of 65 years (P < 0.001). Those patients undergoing surgical treatment showed potentially worse outcomes, with a P value approaching significance at P = 0.08. Conclusion: Numerous cases of trauma associated cruciate paralysis have been reported in the literature; however, there remains a strong need for further study of the condition. While certain risk factors can be elicited from currently reported studies, insignificant data exist to make any sound conclusion concerning whether surgical intervention is always the best method of treatment.


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