Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine

CASE REPORT
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 219--222

Marsupialization and distal obliteration of a lumbosacral dural ectasia in a nonsyndromic, adult patient


Ha Son Nguyen, Andrew Lozen, Ninh Doan, Michael Gelsomin, Saman Shabani, Dennis Maiman 
 Department of Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ha Son Nguyen
9200 West Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53226
USA

Dural ectasia is frequently associated with connective tissue disorders or inflammatory conditions. Presentation in a patient without known risk factors is rare. Moreover, the literature regarding the treatment options for symptomatic dural ectasia is controversial, variable, and limited. A 62-year-old female presents with intractable, postural headaches for years. A lumbar puncture revealed opening pressure 3 cm of water. A computed tomography myelogram of the spine demonstrated erosion of her sacrum due to a large lumbosacral dural ectasia. An initial surgery was attempted to reduce the size of the expansile dura, and reconstruct the dorsal sacrum with a titanium plate (Depuy Synthes, Westchester, PA, USA) to prevent recurrence of thecal sac dilatation. Her symptoms initially improved, but shortly thereafter recurred. A second surgery was then undertaken to obliterate the thecal sac distal to the S2 nerve roots. This could not be accomplished through simple ligation of the thecal sac circumferentially as the ventral dura was noted to be incompetent and attempts to develop an extradural tissue plane were unsuccessful. Consequently, an abundance of fibrin glue was injected into the thecal sac distal to S2, and the dural ectasia was marsupialized rostrally, effectively obliterating the distal thecal sac while further reducing the size of the expansile dura. This approach significantly improved her symptoms at 5 months follow-up. Treatment of dural ectasia is not well-defined and has been variable based on the underlying manifestations. We report a rare patient without risk factors who presented with significant lumbosacral dural ectasia. Moreover, we present a novel method to treat postural headaches secondary to dural ectasia, where the thecal sac is obliterated distal to the S2 nerve roots using an abundance of fibrin glue followed by marsupialization of the thecal sac rostally. This method may offer an effective therapy option as it serves to limit the expansile dura, reducing the cerebrospinal fluid sump and the potential for intracranial hypotension.


How to cite this article:
Nguyen HS, Lozen A, Doan N, Gelsomin M, Shabani S, Maiman D. Marsupialization and distal obliteration of a lumbosacral dural ectasia in a nonsyndromic, adult patient.J Craniovert Jun Spine 2015;6:219-222


How to cite this URL:
Nguyen HS, Lozen A, Doan N, Gelsomin M, Shabani S, Maiman D. Marsupialization and distal obliteration of a lumbosacral dural ectasia in a nonsyndromic, adult patient. J Craniovert Jun Spine [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Aug 12 ];6:219-222
Available from: http://www.jcvjs.com/article.asp?issn=0974-8237;year=2015;volume=6;issue=4;spage=219;epage=222;aulast=Nguyen;type=0