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Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine
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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 351  

Comment: Nonscalpel myelopathy: Cervical myelopathy secondary to neuromyelitis optica


1 Department of Neurology, Neuromuscular Service, Hospital of Clinics at Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba PR, Brazil
2 Department of Medicine, Universidade Positivo, Curitiba PR, Brazil

Date of Submission04-Jul-2020
Date of Acceptance18-Aug-2020
Date of Web Publication26-Nov-2020

Correspondence Address:
Otto Jesus Hernandez Fustes
Av. Marechal Floriano 170, Sala 1509, 80090-020, Curitiba, PR
Brazil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcvjs.JCVJS_98_20

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How to cite this article:
Fustes OJ, Rodriguez CA. Comment: Nonscalpel myelopathy: Cervical myelopathy secondary to neuromyelitis optica. J Craniovert Jun Spine 2020;11:351

How to cite this URL:
Fustes OJ, Rodriguez CA. Comment: Nonscalpel myelopathy: Cervical myelopathy secondary to neuromyelitis optica. J Craniovert Jun Spine [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jan 26];11:351. Available from: https://www.jcvjs.com/text.asp?2020/11/4/351/301635



Dear Editor,

We read with great interest the manuscript by Patel et al. entitled, “Nonscalpel myelopathy: Cervical myelopathy secondary to neuromyelitis optica,”[1] drawing the attention of the neuromyelitis optica diagnosis.

We think that the article offers a good opportunity for resident physicians and specialists to review the neurological manifestations of autoimmune syndrome.

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders are rare antibody-mediated disorders of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the spinal cord and optic nerves. The hallmark manifestations are recurrent longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis and optic neuritis.

The clinical utility of evoked potential recordings in the diagnosis of neurological diseases already been established, which can detect clinically silent lesions in visual, auditory, sensory and motor pathways, particularly in Neuromyelitis optica, abnormal visual evoked potentials are an indicator of optic nerve involvement.

The patient had numbness in all four extremities and hand weakness for 2 weeks with an examination notable for diminished posterior column function, because these disorders may present with predominantly myelopathy; hence, a careful neurologic examination and a thoughtful diagnostic evaluation are necessary to establish a diagnosis.[2]

As a single suggestion, we would like the authors to have complemented the assessment with a neurophysiological study with the electroneuromyography, visual evoked potentials, and somatosensory evoked potential.

We congratulate the authors for the report and the opportunity to delve into a topic so interesting that it will serve as a motivation for further studies.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Patel M, Abboud H, Kasliwal MK. Nonscalpel myelopathy: Cervical myelopathy secondary to neuromyelitis optica. J Craniovertebr Junction Spine 2020;11:55-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Goodman BP. Diagnostic approach to myeloneuropathy. Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2011;17:744-60.  Back to cited text no. 2
    




 

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